MRI BIOPHYSICS GROUP

bridging the micro-macro gap with diffusion MRI

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Affects Amyloid Burden in Cognitively Normal Elderly. A Longitudinal Study.

TitleObstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Affects Amyloid Burden in Cognitively Normal Elderly. A Longitudinal Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsSharma, RA, Varga, AW, Bubu, OM, Pirraglia, E, Kam, K, Parekh, A, Wohlleber, M, Miller, MD, Andrade, A, Lewis, C, Tweardy, S, Buj, M, Yau, PL, Sadda, R, Mosconi, L, Li, Y, Butler, T, Glodzik, L, Fieremans, E, Babb, JS, Blennow, K, Zetterberg, H, Lu, SE, Badia, SG, Romero, S, Rosenzweig, I, Gosselin, N, Jean-Louis, G, Rapoport, DM, de Leon, MJ, Ayappa, I, Osorio, RS
JournalAm J Respir Crit Care Med
Volume197
Pagination933–943
Date PublishedApr
ISSN1535-4970 (Electronic); 1073-449X (Linking)
Keywordsamyloid burden, cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta, cognitive impairment, obstructive sleep apnea, Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography scan
Abstract

{RATIONALE: Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be a risk factor for developing mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. However, how sleep apnea affects longitudinal risk for Alzheimer's disease is less well understood. OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that there is an association between severity of OSA and longitudinal increase in amyloid burden in cognitively normal elderly. METHODS: Data were derived from a 2-year prospective longitudinal study that sampled community-dwelling healthy cognitively normal elderly. Subjects were healthy volunteers between the ages of 55 and 90, were nondepressed, and had a consensus clinical diagnosis of cognitively normal. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta was measured using ELISA. Subjects received Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography scans following standardized procedures. Monitoring of OSA was completed using a home sleep recording device. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We found that severity of OSA indices (AHIall [F1

DOI10.1164/rccm.201704-0704OC
PubMed ID29125327
Research Category: 

Scholarly Lite is a free theme, contributed to the Drupal Community by More than Themes.